Last edited by Tugal
Saturday, November 21, 2020 | History

4 edition of Intellectual freedom and school libraries; found in the catalog.

Intellectual freedom and school libraries;

James A. Harvey

Intellectual freedom and school libraries;

An in-depth case study

by James A. Harvey

  • 16 Want to read
  • 0 Currently reading

Published by American Library Association .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Book selection,
  • Censorship

  • The Physical Object
    FormatUnknown Binding
    Number of Pages135
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL11520512M
    ISBN 100838954243
    ISBN 109780838954249
    OCLC/WorldCa4301605


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Intellectual freedom and school libraries; by James A. Harvey Download PDF EPUB FB2

This brief book uses case studies to illustrate real-life scenarios that school librarians are apt to confront, countering each situation with a recommended course of action that focuses on protecting students' First Amendment rights, intellectual freedom, and by: 3.

Book Summary: Intellectual freedom and school libraries; book Scales uses her experience and expertise to offer an intellectual freedom title tailored to the school library environment. This title presents a number of scenarios in which intellectual freedom is at risk.

Use this important guide from the American Association of School Librarians, Defending Intellectual Freedom: LGBTQ+ Materials in School Libraries, to help guide LGBTQ book selections, challenges, and censorship.

Be sure to read and incorporate the National Council of Teachers of English’s statement on classroom libraries and the right to read. Home › Blog Topics › School Library Month and Intellectual Freedom. School Library Month and Intellectual Freedom By Helen Adams on 04/04/ • (0).

April is School Library Month and this year’s theme is “School Libraries Transform Learning.” The combination of a librarian, students, services, and resources magically (and through a lot of hard work) influence and inspire learning. Intellectual freedom is the right of every individual to seek and receive information from all points of view without restriction.

As a school librarian, you’re on the front line fighting to guarantee that right for today’s—and tomorrow’s—learners.

Defending Intellectual Freedom LGBTQ+ Materials in School Libraries Stemming from an AASL Chapters concern, the ALA Emerging Leaders team was charged with creating a guide for AASL to support school librarians in addressing challenges related to censorship and patron privacy issues, particularly with LGBTQ+ materials.

Claim: 'Happy Banned Books Week. These are the most banned books from public libraries and schools in the U.S. It is mandatory if you have not read all of them that you do so now.'Not True. A commitment to intellectual freedom transforms your library.

ALA actively advocates and educates in defense of intellectual freedom—the rights of library users to read, seek information, and speak freely as guaranteed by the First Amendment.

Intellectual freedom is a core value of the library profession, and a basic right in our democratic society. A publicly supported library provides. The Intellectual Freedom Blog’s purpose is to educate and encourage discussions about intellectual freedom principles and promote the value of libraries, librarians, and professional membership in the American Library Association (ALA).

The blog is managed and edited by staff of ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) to raise awareness of time-sensitive news, issues in the. It describes why intellectual freedom is important in a school library program, the difference between selection and censorship, what to do before a challenge occurs, where to obtain assistance during a challenge, why schools filter and how it affects students intellectual freedom, and how the ALA Code of Ethics affects school librarians.

- School Library Journal "This is a thoroughly researched, yet practical and accessible book. It belongs in all professional collections Highly Recommended." - Library Media Connection, Starred Review "Adams provides wonderful information about intellectual freedom and privacy in our school libraries/5(1).

Rebecca Slocum has worked in education as a teacher and library consultant for the last 5 years and is Intellectual freedom and school libraries; book recent MLIS graduate student from the University of North Texas.

She is interested in issues involving intellectual freedom, censorship, and collection development in school libraries. In her spare time, Rebecca enjoys reading, writing, running, and roaming the world.

—School Library Journal "This is a thoroughly researched, yet practical and accessible book. It belongs in all professional collections Highly Recommended." —Library Media Connection, Starred Review "Adams provides wonderful information about intellectual freedom and privacy in our school libraries.

Over two-thirds of all challenges to books and other resources reported to the ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom occur in schools. This book explores intellectual freedom issues in school library media programs including selection of resources and materials selection policies, challenges and censorship, students' freedom to read, patron privacy and confidentiality of library records, the Cited by: 3.

The latest on intellectual freedom in the digital realm, including an examination of library technology Using examples of censorship battles in both school and public libraries to illustrate possible scenarios, this guidebook gives YA librarians the foreknowledge and support to ensure intellectual freedom.

The following information, reprinted from the American Association of School Librarians (AASL) Intellectual Freedom Committee Brochure: "Access Denied", provides critical insight to the ethical selection of materials available in our school library media center print collection and school. ALA's Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF)is charged with implementing the intellectual freedom policies of the American Library Association through educating librarians and the public about the concept of intellectual freedom as embodied in the Library Bill of Rights, the Association's basic policy on free access to libraries and library materials.

Since it was established inALA's Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) has championed the rights of library users to seek and receive information on all subjects from all points of view without restriction and without having the subject of one's interest examined or scrutinized by others.

The new edition of the Intellectual Freedom Manual is more than just an invaluable. The principles of intellectual freedom—the idea that a democracy is dependent upon free and open access to ideas—are hallmarks of the library and education professions.

But librarians and teachers sometimes face strong opinions regarding what material people think is appropriate for children and teenagers to have access to in a school library, public library, or. Book banning, a form of censorship, occurs when private individuals, government officials, or organizations remove books from libraries, school reading lists, or bookstore shelves because they object to their content, ideas, or advocating a ban complain typically that the book in question contains graphic violence, expresses disrespect for parents and family, is sexually explicit.

American Library Association has recently released Intellectual Freedom Stories from a Shifting Landscape. The book is a collection of stories from and about librarians who have experienced challenges to library material.

Librarians also share stories of how they have worked to champion intellectual freedom through protest and discussion groups. (James LaRue, CEO of LaRue & Associates, director of ALA's Office for Intellectual Freedom from –) "Dr.

Oltmann's wonderful book provides a well-researched, thorough guide to understanding and practicing intellectual freedom in libraries.

Readers are carefully led through the concepts and issues that shape contemporary support for Author: Shannon M. Oltmann. School librarians looking for ideas on how to mark Banned Books Week (Sept. 22–28) can do a quick search on Pinterest and come up with hundreds of examples of elaborate displays to catch a student’s eye.

There are books covered in brown paper, “Wanted” posters for frequently challenged books such as The Diary of Anne Frank and the “Captain Underpants” series, along with. Septem Septem Allyson Mower Banned and Challenged Books, School Libraries, Stand For the Banned.

Teens and Teaching the First Amendment. Students do not necessarily jump for joy if you tell them they will be learning about intellectual freedom and the First Amendment. However, many of these concepts are included in. She earned her doctorate in library and information science from the University of South Carolina.

Prior to joining the faculty at UNCG, Dawkins was a high school librarian for 15 years. Her research examines intellectual freedom issues in school libraries with an emphasis on self-censorship, access, and equity.

Look Inside. The Office for Intellectual Freedom from the American Library Association provides a wide variety of information and helpful resources. National Council of Teachers of English This censorship guide provides background information, a statement regarding students' right to read, and guidelines for the selection of materials in English-language.

Description. This volume of collected articles from the archives of School Library Connection provides school librarians and LIS professors with a one-stop source of information for supporting the core library principle of intellectual freedom. School librarians continue to advocate and champion for student privacy and the right to read and have unfettered access to needed information.

On December 3rd, the committee decided to retain the book in libraries with a vote, citing fervently the district’s policies supporting standards of academic freedom and the freedom to read. The ultimate decision regarding what content is appropriate for an individual, even if that individual is a minor, remains a task for the parent.

ALA's Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) is charged with implementing the intellectual freedom policies of the American Library Association through educating librarians and the public about the concept of intellectual freedom as embodied in the Library Bill of Rights, the Association's basic policy on free access to libraries and library materials.

School Home | Advocacy | Book Awards | Conferences & Events Intellectual Freedom | LIT Framework | Professional Awards Scholarships | Contact ScLD. School Libraries Home. The WLA School Library Division provides networking opportunities and professional support for teacher-librarians and library paraprofessionals, administrators, teachers and parents.

The Maine Association of School Libraries Intellectual Freedom. MASL Maine School Librarian Handbook. IFHandbookdoc. Sample Book Rationales, kindness of Kelley McDaniel: NEW MASL Mailing Address: Maine Association of School Libraries (MASL) c/o Maine State Library.

The Texas Library Association, in order to encourage a united front in defending the right to read, shall cooperate with other organizations concerned with intellectual freedom. The Intellectual Freedom Committee advises on Texas Library Association positions and cooperates with other organizations.

Adopted Septem by the TLA Council. Intellectual Freedom Manual. The Intellectual Freedom Manual is published by the ALA’s Office for Intellectual Freedom. It provides basic information on many ALA policy statements and documents as well as summaries of specific intellectual freedom issues, such.

Intellectual Freedom For Children. Download and Read online Intellectual Freedom For Children ebooks in PDF, epub, Tuebl Mobi, Kindle Book.

Get Free Intellectual Freedom For Children Textbook and unlimited access to our library by created an account. Fast Download speed and ads Free.

Home › Blog Topics › Advocacy/Leadership › Being Proactive About Censorship and Intellectual Freedom. Being Proactive About Censorship and Intellectual Freedom By Daniella Smith on 10/27/ • (0).

Before I share the professional development for November, I want to write to you about some banned book information that I have been the past couple of weeks, I have. The library media specialist must be an advocate for intellectual freedom.

I don't think we should have books containing "bad words" in our library. Google, Yahoo, and all those other search engines just bring porn into the school. Defending Intellectual Freedom.

Download and Read online Defending Intellectual Freedom ebooks in PDF, epub, Tuebl Mobi, Kindle Book. Get Free Defending Intellectual Freedom Textbook and unlimited access to our library by created an account.

Fast Download speed and ads Free. Judith Fingeret Krug (Ma – Ap ) was an American librarian, freedom of speech proponent, and critic of became director of the Office for Intellectual Freedom at the American Library Association in Inshe joined the Freedom to Read Foundation as its executive director.

Krug co-founded Banned Books Week in.